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Shelby GT500 Brake Rotor Upgrade Kit: New at SPP

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Shelby GT500 Brake Rotor Upgrade Kit

 

S7MK-2300-CW-2.jpg

 

Shelby American and Wilwood are pleased to announce an all new high performance front and rear brake upgrade kit for the Shelby GT500 or Mustangs using the GT500s Brembo brake caliper system. If you desire better braking performance on the street and at the track, this race inspired system is what your Shelby or Mustang needs.

 

The front upgrade utilizes the stock 14”x1.25”rotor dimensions while being manufactured from an all new proprietary iron alloy called Spec 37. Wilwood developed this new iron to withstand extreme temperature cycling with the highest possible degree of resistance against distortion, warping, cracking and wear. Every Spec 37 rotor is precision machined to less than .001” run-out, flatness and parallelism, then individually dynamically balanced. All of this adds up to the smoothest braking and longest rotor life on the market.

 

The Spec 37 rotors are bolted to a forged billet aluminum rotor hat using special 12 point stainless steel, high strength bolts that can be safety wired for racing applications. The combination of the two piece rotor and hat reduces rotating and un-sprung weight by 15% over the stock cast iron rotor. The rear rotors retain the stock dimensions also and are manufactured from a premium grade of cast iron.

 

Both front and rear rotors are treated to Wilwood’s drilling, slotting, and special e-coat process. The drilling and slotting enhances the styling, while providing smoother pad engagement. The e-coating adds a rust resistant finish to the entire rotor; including the interior of the vanes and the drilled areas where uncoated surfaces can begin to rust.

 

This engineered package is completed with a set of high performance pads and braided stainless steel brake lines. The specially formulated pads have a far higher co-efficient of friction and higher temperature range than factory replacement pads. The braided stainless brake lines improve pedal feel and provide quicker braking response for more consistent braking lap after lap.

 

Click here for more product information.

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These rotors would be incredible for the street and light track use.

 

I see that there is holes in them, I hope you will also offer ones that will be slotted only so when I get the Boss I can order a set.

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Interesting but not sure all the details add up in the pitch based on my brake history. Seems they are indicating E-coat even on the braking surfaces. Not nice for the brake pads to clean up.

 

Other question is why the brake hoses are added into the kit? Most people looking for using in a track environment have them. I would like to be able to buy just the rotors.

Edited by DrKSGT

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I had ordered on Nov 30 the Front (Product Code: Z28-S7M-2300-C) and Rear Brake ( Product Code: Z28-2262019) Rotors Upgrade. I haven't received them yet. Usually takes 4-6 weeks to be delivered. They are manufactured by Baers.

 

So my questions are:

 

- Which are better measured in quality, performance, durability, etc?

- Both cost the same.

- Baer Rear Rotors are increased to 14" (New Brackets are included)

- Wildwood Rear rotor uses the same stock size (Brackets are not necessary)

- Wildwood kit comes with Braided Steel Lines and Brake Pads. Baers doesn't.

- Shelby won't applied my 15% discount if i change the order cancelling the Baer ones and adding the Wildwood ones

- Shelby representative couldn't give any advise about this decision.

 

So what you guys think? I would apprecaite your advise.

 

thanks,

 

Jorge

Edited by Amigo GT500

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I would be shocked if there was any appreciable difference in performance of one over the other. The only thing I could possible see is a weight difference but even then I doubt it would be enough to claim one better than the other. My personal opinion is that any rotor that is drilled is for the street only and should not be used on the track.

Edited by EL SHELBY

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From Willwood's Site:

 

Rotors Back to Top

 

Q: What's the difference between slotted and drilled/slotted rotors? Which rotor will be best for my application?

A: PSlots or grooves in rotor faces are partly a carryover from the days of asbestos pads. Asbestos and other organic pads were prone to “glazing” and the slots tended to help “scrape or de-glaze” them. Also, cross-drilling and/or slotting the rotor for racing purposes was beneficial by providing a way to expel the gasses created when the bonding agents employed to manufacture the pads began to break down at extreme temperatures. This condition is often referred to as “outgassing.” When it does occur, the driver still has a good firm brake pedal, but a significant reduction in friction. Normally this only happens at temperatures witnessed in racing. However, with today’s race pad technology, “outgassing” is no longer a concern with pads designed for racing.

 

So in the final analysis, drilling and slotting rotors has become popular in street applications for their pure aesthetic value. Wilwood provides rotors slotted, drilled or plain. For most performance applications, slotted is the preferred choice. With certain pad material, slotting can help wipe away debris from between the pad and rotor as well as increasing the coefficient of friction between the rotor and the pad. A drilled rotor provides the same type of benefit, but is more susceptible to cracking under severe usage; however, for street and occasional light duty track use, they will work fine. For more severe applications, we recommend slotted rotors.

 

 

Q: Does my pad bedding process change at all if I have e-coated rotors?

A: No, the bedding process is the same. Remember, proper break-in of pads and rotors is extremely important. Not doing so, can cause permanent damage to rotors and adversely affect overall brake performance. Pads and rotors interact with each other to provide efficient brake performance. The break-in or bed-in procedure is done to condition the pad/rotor interface. Depending on the pad used, more or less pad material is uniformly transferred onto the disc as a thin film. The resins and bonding agents in some pads need to be heat cycled to work properly as well. By not properly bedding-in pads, uneven pad material deposits can occur that may cause a vibration. Improper wear characteristics may also show up on either the pads, or rotors, or both. For further information on bedding, please consult Wilwood's Tech Tip Guide.You can also contact a Wilwood Sales Technician at 805-388-1188 or email Sales/Tech Support.

 

 

Q: What do the black rotors look like once they are bedded-in?

A: The annulus (where the pad comes in contact with the rotor) is quickly stripped of the e-coating and appears the same as any iron rotor. The e-coating remains in the radius around the drilled holes, and in the slots providing a nice contrast and high visibility of the drilled and slotting pattern of the rotor, as well as protecting those areas from rust.

 

 

Q: Why are my rotors black, I wanted zinc?

A: Wilwood uses a process called “E-Coating” to protect our rotors from corrosion. E- coating is another name for electrocoating, electropainting, or electrophoretic lacquering. It is used to deposit a protective coating as opposed to a metal such as is deposited by electroplating. Parts are dipped into a vat of the e-coat material and are electrified in order to promote a reaction at the surface, which deposits the protective agent. Through this process, we ensure that all exposed surfaces are protected from corrosion, providing the very best in protection. You can still order Zinc plated rotors as an option, but keep in mind that the zinc coating is more expensive and offers less rust protection than e-coat.

 

 

 

Edited by EL SHELBY

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From Willwood's Site:

 

Rotors Back to Top

 

Q: What's the difference between slotted and drilled/slotted rotors? Which rotor will be best for my application?

A: PSlots or grooves in rotor faces are partly a carryover from the days of asbestos pads. Asbestos and other organic pads were prone to “glazing” and the slots tended to help “scrape or de-glaze” them. Also, cross-drilling and/or slotting the rotor for racing purposes was beneficial by providing a way to expel the gasses created when the bonding agents employed to manufacture the pads began to break down at extreme temperatures. This condition is often referred to as “outgassing.” When it does occur, the driver still has a good firm brake pedal, but a significant reduction in friction. Normally this only happens at temperatures witnessed in racing. However, with today’s race pad technology, “outgassing” is no longer a concern with pads designed for racing.

 

So in the final analysis, drilling and slotting rotors has become popular in street applications for their pure aesthetic value. Wilwood provides rotors slotted, drilled or plain. For most performance applications, slotted is the preferred choice. With certain pad material, slotting can help wipe away debris from between the pad and rotor as well as increasing the coefficient of friction between the rotor and the pad. A drilled rotor provides the same type of benefit, but is more susceptible to cracking under severe usage; however, for street and occasional light duty track use, they will work fine. For more severe applications, we recommend slotted rotors.

 

 

 

This is good info, and Wilwood certainly know what they are talking about. But it could be argued that drilling the rotor also increases the rotor's ability to cool during rotation. And without doing a detailed geometry excercise, I can only venture a guess that the drilling also increases the rotor's surface area, effectively aiding its heat sink abilities..."hmmm, surface area of round dot removed, vs. new circumference of circle multiplied by the rotor's thickness..." My head hurts. Jer out.

 

:drop:

 

 

Jer

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Jer trust me if you take your car to the road course you would NEVER use drilled rotors I found out the expensive way.

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Jer trust me if you take your car to the road course you would NEVER use drilled rotors I found out the expensive way.

 

 

Wilwood: "If you desire better braking performance on the street and at the track, this race inspired system is what your Shelby or Mustang needs."..

 

 

My head hurts as well........

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Drilled rotors are just for looks. It does not improve braking or cooling. Some may say it does improve cooling of the rotors but drilled rotors heats up much faster as well, so nothing really improves here. It is all marketing gimmick. Also drilling rotors is not about cooling but for reducing weight. Other than that, the kit looks great and for the price, it is a great deal.

Edited by Shelby.GT500

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This is good info, and Wilwood certainly know what they are talking about. But it could be argued that drilling the rotor also increases the rotor's ability to cool during rotation. And without doing a detailed geometry excercise, I can only venture a guess that the drilling also increases the rotor's surface area, effectively aiding its heat sink abilities..."hmmm, surface area of round dot removed, vs. new circumference of circle multiplied by the rotor's thickness..." My head hurts. Jer out.

 

:drop:

 

 

Jer

 

You are on the right track that the drilling provides more surface area for the heat to disapate. Getting heat out of those holes however requires air to flow in through the vanes between the rotor plates. The vane design really can do a lot more for you than the holes. Best is getting ducts to force air into the vanes.

 

My preference is to get heavier rotors, parts with thicker plates. Where I have worked proved that correct rotor mass does more to get stabil brake temperature where linings will live longer.

 

There are othe things in the description that are good. Still not sure about the ecoat being that much better for corrosion protection on performande application. Rotor tempratures are extreme enoughto fry the paint off. Every day use should be ok and get the benefit noted.

 

DrKSGT

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You are on the right track that the drilling provides more surface area for the heat to disapate. Getting heat out of those holes however requires air to flow in through the vanes between the rotor plates. The vane design really can do a lot more for you than the holes. Best is getting ducts to force air into the vanes.

 

 

DrKSGT

 

 

Brake cooling ducts should aid this as well...

 

Jer

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Jer trust me if you take your car to the road course you would NEVER use drilled rotors I found out the expensive way.

 

 

After the last Bash track days, and numerous mountain crosses round-trip in and out of Vegas over the past 2 years, I've seen no issues. Maybe I'm just lucky? I am a very "low-impact" driver, I'm very sensitive to the car's limits...

BTW, I also don't break drumsticks, drumheads, guitar strings, or cymbals nearly as much as other people, so my guardian angel must be looking out for me.

 

:hysterical:

 

 

Jer

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BTW, I also don't break drumsticks, drumheads, guitar strings, or cymbals nearly as much as other people, so my guardian angel must be looking out for me.

 

 

Hey, ME NEITHER!

 

But then again, I don't PLAY any of the above mentioned intruments either! LOL

 

 

Phill "always the smart ass" Pollard

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I've been leaning on getting this setup. However is there an upgrade available for the rear caliper. The OEM ones are punny looking. Will Wilwood/Shelby be coming out with one to match the front Brembo caliper???? That is what many owners would be interested in am guessing from reading numerous forums and threads. Thanks.

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I've been leaning on getting this setup. However is there an upgrade available for the rear caliper. The OEM ones are punny looking. Will Wilwood/Shelby be coming out with one to match the front Brembo caliper???? That is what many owners would be interested in am guessing from reading numerous forums and threads. Thanks.

 

 

At this time we only offer caliper upgrades from Baer.

 

Here are the Extremes: http://www.shelbystore.com/product-p/4262113.htm

 

Here are the Pro+'s: http://www.shelbystore.com/product-p/z28-4262176r.htm

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Jer trust me if you take your car to the road course you would NEVER use drilled rotors I found out the expensive way.

 

 

Did they "pop" on you?

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Did anyone have any user feedback on these? I'm coming up on when I need to do the brakes and was thinking about ordering this kit during the 4th of July sale.

 

Thanks

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