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robertlane

Shelby/ Wilwood Front 6-Piston Big Brake Kit

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We don't offer custom lettering colors, as these are done in batches for us.

What car and wheels do you have? I'll check fitment for you.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Jer

 

 

Thanks Jer,

 

Car is an 07, wheels are Weld Weld Racing BC 009 (also known as Evo Penza 5 SL) 19x8.5 up front, +45 offset if i recall correclty. They're not made anymore, so was hoping that there was a fitment diagram kicking around. Right now they'll need spacers 1/8" spacers I believe, in an ideal world I'd like to get rid of the spacers. Definitely won't go bigger.

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I'll try to get you more fitment info from Wilwood for that setup.

 

 

Jer

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Jer,

 

Are you still planning a Spring sale on SPP Baer brake inventory?

 

 

Yup. What color/axle are you looking for?

 

 

 

Jer

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Thanks Jer.

 

Still working on his. Stay tuned... Jer

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Full info now posted on the new Instructions Page we're building. Eventually, this page will have data and installation instructions for LOTS of SPP stuff:

http://info.shelbyamerican.com/Instructions/Wilwood Rear.pdf

 

http://info.shelbyamerican.com/Instructions/Wilwood Fitment Front.pdf

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Will these brakes work with stock black Shelby Gt wheels?

 

I'd also like to add a color choice of black with silver letters that match my black Shelby GT/SC or silver with black letters.

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I just installed the entire Wilwood brake kit ( front and back). I have not done any track testing yet but will be soon. These brakes fit and look fantastic on the '12 SVT PP GT500. The only modification I still need to do is shave the sway bar ends just a bit for extra clearance from the rear rotors. Initial break in seems to be very noticeable on breaking feel. Attached is front pic, rear pic and full car pic.

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This is my next mod... Just wait'in on a SALE! Hint, hint....

Edited by ViperNC

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Does someone use the frt&rear Shelby Wilwood brake kit ON THE TRACK and can report on it?

+1

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Just got the rear brake kit in from Fed Ex (fronts will hopefully be here in a couple of weeks). Man these things are massive compared to the stock rear setup. Wilwood assured me the overhang was .001 inches greater than the stock caliper and will fit behind my deep dish wheels. Fingers are crossed and will post up when the install is complete for front and rear.

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We worked with Wilwood to develop this kit with SIGNIFICANT offset.

In fact, if you have an aftermarket swaybar, you may need to trim the ends so they don't contact the inside of the rotors.

 

 

Jer

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We worked with Wilwood to develop this kit with SIGNIFICANT offset.

In fact, if you have an aftermarket swaybar, you may need to trim the ends so they don't contact the inside of the rotors.

 

 

Jer

I've got the Shelby sway bar. Should I break out my cutting tool?

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I've got the Shelby sway bar. Should I break out my cutting tool?

 

You should be OK. Just watch the back of the rotors when they go on, make sure there is clearance. If not, snip, snip.

 

Jer

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You should be OK. Just watch the back of the rotors when they go on, make sure there is clearance. If not, snip, snip.

 

Jer

How much clearance am I looking for? I would assume you want at least half an inch or more.

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How much clearance am I looking for? I would assume you want at least half an inch or more.

 

That's about right!

 

Jer

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I really want the Wilwood front brakes. So I can sell my Baer ProPlus series to some person who does not track their car.

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Love this thread. Now, if we can combine multiple responses into one document we would have a research paper.

 

Lets see if my feeble brain can capture most of it

 

Bigger rotors, given equal systems will resist fade better than smaller ones.

 

the more pistons that are in a brake system do not necessarily directly correlate to shorter stopping distances

 

All ABS is not created equally. (Ford has several different calibrations)

 

Bigger brakes on the street are more for looks than for performance (depending on driver style)

 

The stick axle is junk and Ford is way behind everybody else (this ignores a lot of fact of Fords on track success against highly modified IRS systems)

 

Less weight is always a good thing, reducing unsprung weight is like have you cake and ice cream with it

 

Not all big brake systems are built for racing use (different for occasional track days)

 

Eh, too early in the morning for this

 

What I have not seen was an in depth discussion regaurding fluids and pad compounds. I see these mentioned but very little discussion

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Love this thread....

 

 

Less weight is always a good thing, reducing unsprung weight is like have you cake and ice cream with it

 

 

 

What I have not seen was an in depth discussion regaurding fluids and pad compounds. I see these mentioned but very little discussion

Cake and Ice Cream will produce more weight in my case. So will beer, pizza and everything else. :skateboard: Skater emoticon... couldn't resist.

 

Brake Fluid: We went with DOT 5 on my car to resist heat. I figure for track days, that should do just fine. What have others done?

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If you can believe Wikipedia

 

 

DOT 5 is one of several North American designations of automotive hydraulic brake fluid, denoting a particular mixture of chemicals imparting specified ranges of boiling point.

DOT 5 is a silicone-based brake fluid (contains at least 70% by weight of a diorgano polysiloxane[1]).

Unlike polyethylene glycol based fluids, it is hydrophobic. An advantage over other forms of brake fluid is that silicone has a more stable viscosity index over a wider temperature range. Another property is that it does not damage paint[citation needed].

Using DOT 5 in a DOT 3 or DOT 4 system without proper flushing will cause damage to the seals and cause brake failure[citation needed]. DOT 5 brake fluid is not compatible with anti-lock brake systems. DOT 5 brake fluid absorbs a small amount of air requiring care when bleeding the system of air.[citation needed]

 

LCF 660 for the race car

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I found this response to a question regarding the use of DOT 5 on another forum:

 

OK, folks, let's look at each of these 4 items.

1. Fluid compatibility with the brake system rubber, plastic and metal components.
2. Water absorption and corrosion.
3. Fluid boiling point and other physical characteristics.
4. Brake system contamination and sludging.


1. The critical item here is RUBBER. All brake fluids available today are compatible with every metal and plastic used in automotive brake systems since WWII. But natural rubber is a bitch. Anything other than silicone (aka DOT 5) brake fluid will eat away at natural rubber brake components (seals, boots, etc.). Guess what, Honda folks.... your brake systems do not contain natural rubber! In fact, natural rubber has not been part of the brake system of any car built after, say 1970 or so (I'm sure there are the rare exceptions, but let's agree that your Honda does NOT have natural rubber brake components, ok?). The bottom line is that if you are running a car under 30 years old, you may feel free to use ANY brake fluid you choose, from an equipment compatibility standpoint.

2. DOT 5 Silicone fluid is the only brake fluid that does NOT absorb water. This is good and bad. If your brake system has been properly filled with 100% (not 99.5%) DOT 5 and properly bled (remember, air contains water), then you should be fine. But since most people like to cut corners, any mixture of glycol-based (DOT 3 or 4 or 5.1) brake fluids will quickly absorb that water and create bubbles that will, when the car sits, rust out your brake lines from the inside; and, when the car drives hard, possible cause a "vapor-lock" style brake failure.

On the other hand, you could fill up your system with a glycol-based fluid, forget the silicone, and be just fine with whatever small amount of moisture happened to be in the lines, since it would dissolve throughout the whole system of fluid and only pose a problem if the proportion of water rose too high.

3. Boiling point is only an issue for high-performance applications. Yes, DOT 5 has a higher b.p. than DOT 3 or 4, but its quirky properties make it not suitable for most people. No offense intended, but I don't think the average rice boy has the attention to detail required to run a car with silicone fluid. Use DOT 4 Castrol GT/LMA. It's by far the best performance to forgiveness trade-off.

4. Contamination and sludging is going to be dependent on how well one flushes and maintains the system, not the fluid one uses. But as I said before, silicone fluid-- if allowed to mix with water-- will put all that water in one place in your system and potentially cause corrosion from the inside.

The quote in the OP had some crazy statement about how silicone rubber parts "are attacked by silicon [sic] fluids." This is ridiculous. Silicone (which is not the same a "silicon") brake fluid is like Johnson's Baby Shampoo. It doesn't corrode anything, much less something else made of silicone. It's the only brake fluid that won't eat your paint if you happen to spill some.




I'm no expert on brake fluid, but I'm fairly certain I'll be fine as the Wilwood system is by definition a high performance/racing application. Hope this helps.

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Brake Fluid is rated by dry boiling point (for fluid fresh out of the bottle) and wet boiling point (for fluid saturated with moisture). If you bleed brakes frequently, the dry boiling point is most important. If you do not change your brake fluid often, the wet boiling point becomes more important. All of our fluids except AP600 will mix with DOT 3, 4, and 5.1 fluids. None of the fluids we carry are compatible with DOT 5 (silicone) fluids.

Racing Brake Fluid Comparison Chart Brand Name DOT
Rating Dry
Boiling
Point Wet
Boiling
Point Compatible with
Conventional
Brake Fluids* Qty
Fl Oz Part
Number Motul RBF 660 4 617 399 Yes 16.9

MT660 AP PRF 600 4 608 311 Yes 16.9 3338-17oz

Motul RBF 600 4 594 421 Yes 16.9 MT600

Castrol SRF 4 590 518 Yes 33.8 3343-Liter

Prospeed RS683 4 583 394 Yes 16.9 3340-201

AP 600 n/a 572 284 * No * 16.9 3309-17oz

AP 551 3 540 284 Yes 16.9 3305-17oz

ATE Type 200 4 536 396 Yes 33.8 3327-Liter

Castrol Advanced Performance(formerly GT-LMA) 4 509(was 446) 329 Yes 12 3308-12oz

 

This chart talks about specific brake fluids.

 

Sorry if this is hard to read, chart did not copy well

Edited by svttim

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