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Super snake wheels would be made if Shelby performance ordered more? Every body wants super snake wheels, let us buy them from Alcoa ourselves.

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Several good thoughts there.

No matter what, the wheels will NOT say "Super Snake"... I WOULD like the Shelby logo, and a tasteful center cap.

And I would also like to keep the price as reasonable as possible, while still making a quality wheel.

 

Jer

 

 

It definintely has to say shelby forged. It doesn't need to say super snake. A tasteful new center cap would be nice but not a requirement per say.

 

But yea Jer I believe you should talk with all your wheel manufactuers. Again it doesn't have to be alcoa. If they want to do it great if not go with someone else. And again order as many as people will buy. You can gurantee the majority of people will be buying more than 4 wheels each. Depending on price people buy 2 sets of wheels rather than 1 set and a couple spares.

 

And if you could do a 20 inch rim and be 10 inches wide or 11 inches wide that would be good too. But we can't go too wide that the car requires modifcations to fit the wheel. Go as wide as possible that does not require modification to anything on the car to make it fit. If you go too wide that the car requires changes to make it work then I forsee many people not ordering these wheels.

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Jer,

If that Alcoa thing is going nowhere...

On the 13' GT350, SA came up with a VERY nice "racy" one piece (forged?) wheels in 19"

Why not these in 20" ? 20x9.5 / 20x10.5 with SHELBY engraved script...

You would then have modular deep dish wheels (SS type) + One piece forged wheels, to please everyone!

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I questioned this at a time when I had two spare front 9's (original Super Snake), and two spare 10's (Shelby Forged only). My machine shop guy said that it is a ball mill that was originally used for the letters and if it were a flat surface, no problem, the issues is, the surface is not flat, it is a curved lip and an articulating ball mill would have to be used. He said that few machine shops have the articulating feature that can follow the curve of the lip.

 

He also said that it "appears" that the wheel was Durabrighted, after the engraving to seal the natural/bare aluminum from the elements. If I were to have the letters machined into my wheel lips, without some sort of protective Durabright finish, the "after the fact" engraved letters would quickly begin to oxidize. There was also mention of the Durabright chipping on the edges around the "after the fact" engraved area. He also mentioned possible clearcoating, but it would really need to be just the letters............Sounded like a PITA to me, and shortly after I found a correct set of Alcoa's for my Super Snake wheel widening project.

The ball mill engraving below......

 

 

Robert,

 

Although the picture you provided is of a ball mill machining process, I can say without hesitation that my KR wheels are most definitely NOT ball milled. They were done with a end mill. Regardless, whomever were to mill the wheel could use either. The only difference is the shape of the mill. It also appears your pic shows a double pass ball mill rather than a single pass end mill such as my KR's appear to have.

 

I haven't looked at my 20" Alcoa's closely but I will to see if they were done with a ball mill or end mill. However, I'm not sure what difference it makes. Either one gets the same approximate results. One with a sharp edged groove, the other with a rounded edge groove.

 

As far as what machine is used to mill the "curved lip" of the wheel, it matters not. It would be the *jig* that matters. Any milling/drilling machine could be used with the correct jig. The jig would require the ability to turn the wheel at a angle and on its axis, which is no big deal in the world of machining.

 

However, as I stated in my post above, a simple wheel machine would do the job. This is a machine that allows you to place a blank in it and it machines the wheel to the design you have created via a Auto Cad program, then input the file into the CNC aspect of the machine. Again, watch the Tuttle's TV show 'Orange County Choppers' to see what a wheel machine looks like and how it works. You don't have to start with a blank, you could start with a completed 20" Alcoa (Super Snake style) wheel and just have the "Super Snake" logo milled at the points on the rim where you wanted them. ANY wheel mfgr. has a wheel machine as do some custom shops (such as OCC).

 

Now as far as the Dura-Bright process chipping around the edges, I'm not sure what the Dura-Bright process is and Alcoa doesn't give out that information so I'd be speculating to say it will chip or flake around the edges. I know that one of my KR's came to me with a slight dent on one edge and it is NOT chipping so my suspicion is that it's not a clear-coat type of finish, or a surface coating at all but rather some sort of hard anodizing process. Meaning, it wouldn't chip from machining through it.

 

I can't tell you if the wheel had the Dura-bright process pre or post milling though. That is impossible to ascertain.

 

As to your comment about how the engraved letters would quickly begin to oxidize (left un-coated), I beg to differ. The aluminum used for the Forged Dura-Bright wheels is a top quality material. I have many many such parts on my Harley-Davidson and oxidizing is a non-issue. None of my parts are coated, all are bare polished aluminim. My bike has sat for 5 years since I moved to CO and I have not touched the aluminum parts on it in those 5 years and there is NO oxidization. Prior to moving to CO I lived on the West Coast of CA and the only problem I had with oxidation was on a set of cheap Arlen Ness mirrors (cheap, as in the quality of aluminum he uses).

 

FWIW, my profession was as a Auto Tech but my passion is machining. I have a 4.0 gpa college education in Manufacturing Processes (a fancy name for Machine Shop) so I do know a little bit about machine processes. I'm not just some layman talking out of my butt.

 

 

Phill

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Robert,

 

Although the picture you provided is of a ball mill machining process, I can say without hesitation that my KR wheels are most definitely NOT ball milled. They were done with a end mill. Regardless, whomever were to mill the wheel could use either. The only difference is the shape of the mill. It also appears your pic shows a double pass ball mill rather than a single pass end mill such as my KR's appear to have.

 

I haven't looked at my 20" Alcoa's closely but I will to see if they were done with a ball mill or end mill. However, I'm not sure what difference it makes. Either one gets the same approximate results. One with a sharp edged groove, the other with a rounded edge groove.

 

As far as what machine is used to mill the "curved lip" of the wheel, it matters not. It would be the *jig* that matters. Any milling/drilling machine could be used with the correct jig. The jig would require the ability to turn the wheel at a angle and on its axis, which is no big deal in the world of machining.

 

However, as I stated in my post above, a simple wheel machine would do the job. This is a machine that allows you to place a blank in it and it machines the wheel to the design you have created via a Auto Cad program, then input the file into the CNC aspect of the machine. Again, watch the Tuttle's TV show 'Orange County Choppers' to see what a wheel machine looks like and how it works. You don't have to start with a blank, you could start with a completed 20" Alcoa (Super Snake style) wheel and just have the "Super Snake" logo milled at the points on the rim where you wanted them. ANY wheel mfgr. has a wheel machine as do some custom shops (such as OCC).

 

Now as far as the Dura-Bright process chipping around the edges, I'm not sure what the Dura-Bright process is and Alcoa doesn't give out that information so I'd be speculating to say it will chip or flake around the edges. I know that one of my KR's came to me with a slight dent on one edge and it is NOT chipping so my suspicion is that it's not a clear-coat type of finish, or a surface coating at all but rather some sort of hard anodizing process. Meaning, it wouldn't chip from machining through it.

 

I can't tell you if the wheel had the Dura-bright process pre or post milling though. That is impossible to ascertain.

 

As to your comment about how the engraved letters would quickly begin to oxidize (left un-coated), I beg to differ. The aluminum used for the Forged Dura-Bright wheels is a top quality material. I have many many such parts on my Harley-Davidson and oxidizing is a non-issue. None of my parts are coated, all are bare polished aluminim. My bike has sat for 5 years since I moved to CO and I have not touched the aluminum parts on it in those 5 years and there is NO oxidization. Prior to moving to CO I lived on the West Coast of CA and the only problem I had with oxidation was on a set of cheap Arlen Ness mirrors (cheap, as in the quality of aluminum he uses).

 

FWIW, my profession was as a Auto Tech but my passion is machining. I have a 4.0 gpa college education in Manufacturing Processes (a fancy name for Machine Shop) so I do know a little bit about machine processes. I'm not just some layman talking out of my butt.

 

 

Phill

 

 

You go glen coco you go.

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Jer,

If that Alcoa thing is going nowhere...

On the 13' GT350, SA came up with a VERY nice "racy" one piece (forged?) wheels in 19"

Why not these in 20" ? 20x9.5 / 20x10.5 with SHELBY engraved script...

You would then have modular deep dish wheels (SS type) + One piece forged wheels, to please everyone!

 

 

You talking about this? http://www.teamshelby.com/forums/index.php/gallery/image/8568-2013-shelby-gt350-build/ There are like 20 aftermarket wheel companies that make the same thing.

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You talking about this? http://www.teamshelb...by-gt350-build/ There are like 20 aftermarket wheel companies that make the same thing.

 

 

Forged?

Lightweight?

With correct S197 Mustang offsets?

With SHELBY logo?

In 20x9.5 & 20x10.5?

Buy me a set please, I am wiring you the money...

Thank you.

Ah ah ah ah...

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Well truforged and HRE make a set. Will have correct offset and the sizes you want.

 

Only thing it won't have is shelby logo. Though the wheels in that picture don't have the shelby logo either unless I missed it.

 

So wheres my money? :)

Edited by svt13

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Never mind.

:shrug:

 

Jer will have some headache trying to make all of us satisfied...

I am afraid.

 

 

Jer can make 95 percent of people happy. I already said it and its so simple. If alcoa can't do the job then GOOD BYE DURABRIGHT FINISH. So the people who only care about the durabright finish will be unhappy. There is nothing special about the look it just looks like a regular chrome or polished wheel. The only difference is crap won't wipe off as easily as it does with the dura bright finish but oh well thats the price to pay.

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Robert,

 

Although the picture you provided is of a ball mill machining process, I can say without hesitation that my KR wheels are most definitely NOT ball milled. They were done with a end mill. Regardless, whomever were to mill the wheel could use either. The only difference is the shape of the mill. It also appears your pic shows a double pass ball mill rather than a single pass end mill such as my KR's appear to have.

 

I haven't looked at my 20" Alcoa's closely but I will to see if they were done with a ball mill or end mill. However, I'm not sure what difference it makes. Either one gets the same approximate results. One with a sharp edged groove, the other with a rounded edge groove.

 

As far as what machine is used to mill the "curved lip" of the wheel, it matters not. It would be the *jig* that matters. Any milling/drilling machine could be used with the correct jig. The jig would require the ability to turn the wheel at a angle and on its axis, which is no big deal in the world of machining.

 

However, as I stated in my post above, a simple wheel machine would do the job. This is a machine that allows you to place a blank in it and it machines the wheel to the design you have created via a Auto Cad program, then input the file into the CNC aspect of the machine. Again, watch the Tuttle's TV show 'Orange County Choppers' to see what a wheel machine looks like and how it works. You don't have to start with a blank, you could start with a completed 20" Alcoa (Super Snake style) wheel and just have the "Super Snake" logo milled at the points on the rim where you wanted them. ANY wheel mfgr. has a wheel machine as do some custom shops (such as OCC).

 

Now as far as the Dura-Bright process chipping around the edges, I'm not sure what the Dura-Bright process is and Alcoa doesn't give out that information so I'd be speculating to say it will chip or flake around the edges. I know that one of my KR's came to me with a slight dent on one edge and it is NOT chipping so my suspicion is that it's not a clear-coat type of finish, or a surface coating at all but rather some sort of hard anodizing process. Meaning, it wouldn't chip from machining through it.

 

I can't tell you if the wheel had the Dura-bright process pre or post milling though. That is impossible to ascertain.

 

As to your comment about how the engraved letters would quickly begin to oxidize (left un-coated), I beg to differ. The aluminum used for the Forged Dura-Bright wheels is a top quality material. I have many many such parts on my Harley-Davidson and oxidizing is a non-issue. None of my parts are coated, all are bare polished aluminim. My bike has sat for 5 years since I moved to CO and I have not touched the aluminum parts on it in those 5 years and there is NO oxidization. Prior to moving to CO I lived on the West Coast of CA and the only problem I had with oxidation was on a set of cheap Arlen Ness mirrors (cheap, as in the quality of aluminum he uses).

 

FWIW, my profession was as a Auto Tech but my passion is machining. I have a 4.0 gpa college education in Manufacturing Processes (a fancy name for Machine Shop) so I do know a little bit about machine processes. I'm not just some layman talking out of my butt.

 

 

Phill

 

 

I am/was only quoting what I was told by a local CNC friend that I use, and yes I did have wheel damage on the face of one Alcoa spoke, the Durabright was missing, and it was rough around the edge where the wheel/spoke had been rubbed/dropped against something solid, maybe contact with an edge. The surface underneith was not bight, it was dull, same color, but dull.

 

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M

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Guys, don't shoot the messenger.

 

 

Mine was just a bit of friendly advice. I'm saying that if Jer keeps singing the company song, it will be HIS cred that gets destroyed, not theirs.

 

Jer has a good rep around here and I'd hate to seem him ruin that by repeating the hym, "Dura-bright is dead...Dura-bright is dead...Dura-bright is dead." We know for *fact* that's not true.

 

I can't say either way about the other part........

 

 

 

That's all I was sayin',

 

Phill

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Jer can make 95 percent of people happy. I already said it and its so simple. If alcoa can't do the job then GOOD BYE DURABRIGHT FINISH. So the people who only care about the durabright finish will be unhappy. There is nothing special about the look it just looks like a regular chrome or polished wheel. The only difference is crap won't wipe off as easily as it does with the dura bright finish but oh well thats the price to pay.

 

 

So, SVT13,

You decide the Durabright fans are only 5%.

You decide it's a minor trade off.

You must know better.

By the way, how many Alcoas Durabright have you owned?

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Well truforged and HRE make a set. Will have correct offset and the sizes you want.

Only thing it won't have is shelby logo. Though the wheels in that picture don't have the shelby logo either unless I missed it.

So wheres my money? :)

 

 

Show them to me, To me they are not the same.

I don't pay if I don't see... :)

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So, SVT13,

You decide the Durabright fans are only 5%.

You decide it's a minor trade off.

You must know better.

By the way, how many Alcoas Durabright have you owned?

 

 

Yes I did lol.

 

But seriously people like the "look" of durabright I doubt anyone knew the true advantage of it till Phill pointed it out.

 

And you know damn well I've never owned a set of alcoas why do even bother asking?

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Some things are better left unsaid.

 

Just sayin.

 

Roger

 

 

And since you finally chimed in what do you think about this whole scenario? Would you be in favor of doing a limited time last run of the alcoas? Or an alcoa clone by a different company like true forged?

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Never mind.

:shrug:

 

Jer will have some headache trying to make all of us satisfied...

I am afraid.

 

 

Who told you? Wow, word gets around.

Well, one of the sales guys had some ibuprofen, so I feel much better now.

 

We're still working on it over here, folks - I'll do my best!

 

 

Jer

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Mine was just a bit of friendly advice. I'm saying that if Jer keeps singing the company song, it will be HIS cred that gets destroyed, not theirs.

 

Jer has a good rep around here and I'd hate to seem him ruin that by repeating the hym, "Dura-bright is dead...Dura-bright is dead...Dura-bright is dead." We know for *fact* that's not true.

 

I can't say either way about the other part........

 

 

 

That's all I was sayin',

 

Phill

 

 

Phil,

 

Thanks for the kind words.

I was given incomplete information, that's all. Anyone who knows me would attest that I'm not a "company song" kinda guy. Not gonna happen.

Anyone who knows me also will attest that I'mm a lousy singer.

:rockon:

 

 

Jer

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Who told you? Wow, word gets around.

Well, one of the sales guys had some ibuprofen, so I feel much better now.

 

We're still working on it over here, folks - I'll do my best!

 

 

Jer

 

 

When do you think we'll get a final resolution to end the matter once and for all? I think people need a definite yes or no. Not something unclear and in the middle.

 

Either sorry guys it will never happen again. Or yes we can do it.

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The Alcoa Durabright bright silver vs. the dark look..............Weren't all of these Alcoa's Durabright finish as sent from Alcoa? and the dark Alcoa's were powder coated after the fact?

 

If I remember correctly, in 2011, some Super Snake buyers made mention of waiting for their Alcoa's to come back from powder coating before they could take delivery.

 

Then there were the SPP Alcoa's that were sold.......I think there was an upcharge for dark, for powder coating, and then some guys bought them bright and had the powder coating done locally.

 

Isn't this the way the dark Alcoa's came about? They are/were all bright (Durabright finish) to start with, and the dark finish was an "after Alcoa" thing?

 

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M

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When do you think we'll get a final resolution to end the matter once and for all? I think people need a definite yes or no. Not something unclear and in the middle.

 

Either sorry guys it will never happen again. Or yes we can do it.

 

Not that simple.

I am researching ways to do it. It's not definite either way. Sorry, if this were clear, it'd be easy.

The reason it's "unclear and in the middle" is because someone at Shelby (me) is trying to get you all what you want. And it takes some time.

 

Please don't add a deadline crunch to an already challenging situation.I'm working as fast as I can, giving it a LOT of my focus and energy. I appreciate your patience.

 

 

Jer

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Not that simple.

I am researching ways to do it. It's not definite either way. Sorry, if this were clear, it'd be easy.

The reason it's "unclear and in the middle" is because someone at Shelby (me) is trying to get you all what you want. And it takes some time.

 

Please don't add a deadline crunch to an already challenging situation.I'm working as fast as I can, giving it a LOT of my focus and energy. I appreciate your patience.

 

 

Jer

 

 

That sounds fair enough. Are you allowed to say currently what is your biggest obstacle needed to be overcome to make this happen? Or at least some of the obstacles?

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That sounds fair enough. Are you allowed to say currently what is your biggest obstacle needed to be overcome to make this happen? Or at least some of the obstacles?

 

 

No different than any other business decisions: features, pricing, manufacturing, sales forecasting, etc... lots to go over. It just doesn't happen overnight.

I promise to keep updating you all in a timely fashion.

 

Jer

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