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Who Owns The Very First Ford Mustang?

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"On a visit there this week, I saw a bunch of cool ones, including a ’65 Shelby Cobra GT 350 ($4,547 new, a fortune now)"

 

:headscratch:

 

I know what they meant though. Nice article; lot of fun stuff popping up for 50 years!

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Isn't the 1st Mustang, the orange with white top the car Richard, from Fast & Loud bought for $60,000 from the little old lady?

Edited by BAD SNAKE

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Isn't the 1st Mustang, the orange with white top the car Richard, from Fast & Loud bought for $60,000 from the little old lady?

 

No. Although it is a cool car. An unrestored original. I don't know why she sold it to them. She could have gotten a lot more with any broker Edited by twobjshelbys

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My daughter lives in La Crescenta, Calif., with her June '64 built '64 1/2 'vert. She has meet the guy with Vin #2, who lives down the street from her, small world! Hers is repainted from Sunlight Yellow to Playmate Pink though, not original anymore….. :)

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I thought the first one belongs to a school reacher somewhere in the Midwest.

Light blue color I believe.

I am not sure on all of the details.

Will see if I can find the original article.

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From the MOCSEM newsletter about the First Mustang sold..

February 2014 issue...

Here is the web site to view the light blue vehicle.

 

 

The Accelerator
Page
7
Mustang Owners
Club of Southeastern Michigan • PO Box 39088, Redford, MI 48239 • www.mocsem.com
Gail Brown
-
Wise Mustang Purchase
by Gail and Tom Wise
G
ail Brown
-
Wise
was at Mustang Memories in 2013 and is a
current MOCSEM member.
On Wednesday, April 15, 1964, I purchased my 1964 ½
Mustang. I was 22 years old and had recently graduated from
Chicago Teachers’ College. I had just obtained my first teaching
job in
the suburbs and needed transportation to travel there. I
was living at home in Chicago with my parents. That night we
went shopping for a new car for me. My folks drove convertibles.
They had a ’49 Ford convertible and a ’57 red and black Ford
convertible
that I was used to driving. I knew that I wanted a
convertible. We went car shopping at Johnson Ford on Cicero
Avenue in Chicago. When I told the salesman that I wanted a
convertible, he said he had none on the floor, but to follow him
into the backroom t
o look at something special. There under a
tarp was a “skylight blue” Mustang convertible. One look and I
knew it was for me. This car was sporty; it went zoom, zoom; it
had bucket seats; automatic transmission on the floor; power
steering; turn signals an
d an AM radio. It was AWESOME and I
said “I’ll take it!” The salesman replied, that it was a special car
and it was not to go on sale until Friday, “but” he sold it to me
that night. I paid $3,447.50, more than half a year’s salary. My
teacher’s salary wa
s $5,100. My mom and dad paid for the car
with a check for the full amount with the stipulation that I would
pay them back.
I realized that I had bought something special that night when I
drove it out of the show room. As I drove down the street, people
started waving at me and giving me hi
-
fives or asking me to slow
down so they could observe the Mustang. I felt like a movie star,
but it was the car everyone was staring at. The next day I drove
the new wheels to school and it was a big hit in the parking
lot.
The school was attached to a junior high with seventh and eighth
graders. The boys were hovering over the car and anybody else
who would drive by the parking lot would stop to check it out.
The custodian said, “Miss Brown, I wish I had a nickel for
e
veryone that looks at your car, because I would be a
millionaire!” That’s how popular the Mustang was for quite a
while.
When Lee Iacocca unveiled the Mustang to the world at the New
York World’s Fair on Friday, April 17, I already had been driving
one fo
r two days! I have fond memories from that time 50 years
ago.As time went on, I married my college sweetheart, and we
had four children. We moved to the suburbs and Tom used the
Mustang as a daily driver until 1979. One day he told me that he
pushed the Mu
stang into the garage because something was
wrong and that he would fix it next week. NEXT WEEK turned
into 27 years. It became a depository for all sorts of things such
as lawn chairs, bicycle parts, etc., and most of the time one
could not tell there was
a car underneath all of the “stuff”. But it
held its space in the garage, even though I would complain that
he should sell it so we could use the area for children’s bikes,
equipment, etc. Instead of selling it, he built an addition on to the
two car gara
ge so he could keep the car. I knew he was serious
about wanting this car.
In 2006 we made a decision to restore the Mustang. Tom
contacted an auto restorer who said that he could do the job.
Tom removed the engine and transmission and all of the other
co
mponents. All that remained was the basic framework, sheet
metal, wheels and steering wheel when it was trailered to the
restorer. Ten months later the car was returned to us. The car
was then fitted with a new top and interior and the remaining
components
(bumpers, lights, heater and windshield wipers, etc.)
were re
-
installed.
In 2008 the restoration was complete without any modifications
or alterations. The car appears today as it did the day it was
purchased.
Tom spent many days researching the Mustan
g stories on the
internet. One story attracted his eye about being the first one
sold on April 16. He checked the date on my sales receipt and
found it was April 15, 1964. He contacted the “Concierge Desk”
at Hagerty Insurance Company about his discovery.
Upon
seeing the copy of the sales receipts and hearing the story,
Hagerty Insurance Company employed Mike Mueller, who writes
extensively about Mustangs, to write a story about the car. This
was followed by a story in “Mustang Monthly Magazine” written
by
Editor Donald Farr.
Today we continue on our path of appearing at antique auto

 

The Accelerator
Page
7
Mustang Owners
Club of Southeastern Michigan • PO Box 39088, Redford, MI 48239 • www.mocsem.com
Gail Brown
-
Wise Mustang Purchase

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I thought the first one belongs to a school reacher somewhere in the Midwest.

Light blue color I believe.

I am not sure on all of the details.

Will see if I can find the original article.

If you read the article, this car is also discussed among others. It's only the first until somebody has paperwork to prove an earlier sale. Odds of somebody just walking into the dealership and purchasing the first Mustang sold is pretty unlikely, but possible until somebody proves otherwise. The Wise car is supposedly the first Mustang sold, not the first Mustang. There's first prototypes, first serial numbers, first sold. Now they are bickering about which serial number was actually made first, etc. There's lots of firsts out there.

Edited by JeffJ

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I thought the first one belongs to a school teacher somewhere in the Midwest.

Light blue color I believe.

I am not sure on all of the details.

Will see if I can find the original article.

I believe that is the first one purchased ever, not the first one built.

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I should have clarified about it being the first one being sold.

I read the article as posted above.

Agreed, prototypes, who knows where they are.

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Yes, this all gets back to any collectable car, VINs were probably never sequentially produced out the factory door on the line in order with any consistency. They aren't today either, I have watched them before at some factories for Corvettes, not in order at all.

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There were pre production Mustangs built too, but vin #1 Ford has it in their museum, is it the first one built, no. The lady with the blue one may indeed have the first one sold, not vin # 1.

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Gail Wise's purchase is the first sold, since the dealer sold it 2 days before they were supposed to be for sale. But the VIN on her car in in the 9000s, so it's not even close to the first one made. My '64 1/2 VIN is 3219, with a guestimated build date of Mar 23, so it makes my car older than hers, but I don't know when it was bought (I'm the 3rd owner).

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Well this should help narrowing it down, "NOT ME!" LOL Sorry, but I had too!

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Bob Fria's book is really good on how the Mustang came to be and the prototypes and 'first' one made, etc. A good read about the early days. A lot of misconceptions and old rumors cleared up with facts.

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I do not put much value in the MMN article and its author as to researching owner hearsay versus all the Ford and Mustang historians from MCA and the various long time Ford automotive biographers.

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