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Need Views On How To Store My Car For Apprx 5 Or. 6 Months ?????

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My plans are to clean and wax car,and then to put battery tender on, and put car cover over it,but no one will be around car for 5 or 6 months should I just unhook battery or leave a tender on it I guess I'm kinda worried about tender shorten out or catching on fire or something. What say you

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Not necessary. Just inflate tires a little over. My gt was in the garage for over 7 months on tender and over inflated tires with no problems

Edited by twobjshelbys

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Speaking of storing the cars. My car does sit for maybe a month at time then I take it out and give a little excercise. When it's not being run I always put it on the tender. While it charged the battery full it was on the yellow light, then once it was fully charged it switched to float. Well just recently after the last time I took the car out and did this same thing, hooked it up to the tender, I noticed it hasn't switched over to the float, just stays on the charging light. This is the first time I've noticed this. Has anyone ever had that happen where the tender won't switch to the float?

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Here are my recommendations to prepare your Shelby for storage. I was in the marine industry for years and the proper winterization of boats was important. Some of my suggestions come from that experience:

 

1. Change the engine oil and filter prior to storage. Used oil contains chemical contaminants that can cause corrosion in to internal engine parts during long periods of storage.

 

2. Put a fuel stabilizer in your gas tank. I recommend StarTron. It is particularly effective for preserving ethanol fuels up to 2 years. Boats and yachts often sit for long periods of time without use. Never heard of a single fuel related issue for those using StarTron. Actually, I use Startron year around to prevent fuel problems from occurring.

 

http://mystarbrite.com/startron/

 

3. Make sure the gas tank is 95% full when stored (leave some room for expansion when the weather gets warmer). This prevents open space in the tank that can allow condensation to form and run into the fuel under certain atmospheric conditions. A full tank greatly reduces the risk of this occurring.

 

4. Get an intelligent battery maintainer that will keep the battery charged but automatically regulate the current to prevent overcharging. I use a CTEK Multi US 7002. Very good piece of equipment. I also leave the battery in the car.

 

http://smartercharger.com/products/batterychargers/ctek-multi-us-7002/

 

5. Check the engine coolant levels. Test the coolant for proper anti-freeze protection levels. If the coolant is bad, flush the system and add new coolant. Don’t forget the SC coolant system as well.

 

6. Inflate the tires to the correct pressure. Use Flatstoppers to prevent flat spots on your tires

 

http://www.autogeek.net/tire-supports.html

 

7. Chock the back wheels (I use large rubber chocks) to prevent the car from rolling. Release the emergency brake. If left on for long periods, the metallic brake pads can fuse to the rotors.

 

8. Wash the car and apply a good protective coat of polish. I recommend Liquid Glass.

 

http://www.autobarn.net/liquid-glass.html

 

9. A car cover to keep the dust out is OK as long as it is porous and can breath. Heavy, non-porous covers allow moisture to collect underneath and corrosion can result. This is true for both indoor and outdoor storage under a cover.

 

10. If you live in a damp area or store the car in a damp area. Put some No-Damp canisters in the interior to absorb any moisture that gets in.

 

http://www.starbrite.com/category/no-damp-dehumidifier

 

11. If you have a rodent problem, cover the exhaust pipes to prevent the critters from building a nest inside. Rodents can also chew up wires and get into other places in the car and cause havoc. I recommend mouse/rat traps if the circumstances warrant. Another alternative is to get a garage dwelling tom cat. That is correct. Your dog cannot help you with a rodent problem.

 

Good luck!!

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In the Vehicle Storage section, the owners manual recommends: "Start the engine every 15 days. Run at fast idle until it reaches normal operating temperature." Any opinions on that recommendation?

 

This just seems to me like it would cause more harm than good. My opinion is the oil would fill with condensation unless you let the engine run for a significant period of time to burn off any accumulated moisture.

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Living in Chicago I store my cars in non heated garages from 11/1 thru 4/1.

Agree with Silver Snake with the exception of fuel additives and tire pressure.

 

Read the owners manual as some MFRs recommend against using fuel additives (one of mine does).

I do top off the tank with fresh gas as close to the beginning storage date as possible.

 

I over inflate the tires about 10 psi to prevent flat spots.

Both cars are parked on plastic tarps to prevent moisture from seeping up. I also put out Decon every month (sorry PETA).

My cars are hooked to a battery tender between drives (year around) and both have their 2007 original batteries.

 

If you store a car on blocks it is recommended you remove the tires as they will stress the suspension.

Good luck

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In the Vehicle Storage section, the owners manual recommends: "Start the engine every 15 days. Run at fast idle until it reaches normal operating temperature." Any opinions on that recommendation?

 

This just seems to me like it would cause more harm than good. My opinion is the oil would fill with condensation unless you let the engine run for a significant period of time to burn off any accumulated moisture.

Agree that starting and idling a car in storage would do more harm that good. It takes a significant amount of time to "cook" the condensation out of the engine and exhaust system that forms when it is started. Actually, I never start my Shelby unless I can drive it for at least 15 miles.

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Agree with Silver Snake with the exception of fuel additives -- Read the owners manual as some MFRs recommend against using fuel additives (one of mine does).

I do top off the tank with fresh gas as close to the beginning storage date as possible.

I think the owners manuals for every car made today recommends against using fuel additives. All I can tell you is that the consequences of running stale fuel in you engine are far more serious than any risk associated with using a high quality additive like Startron. As I said above, I never heard of any problems with anyone using Startron in their boats. We had a lot of problems with customers that did not use a stabilizer when storing boats. I currently use Startron in every vehicle I own and have done so for many years. Never a fuel related issue of any kind.

Edited by IngotSilverSnake

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i'm not sure a boat engine is a good example to draw from. i wouldn't use an additive like that in my car, i would research the topic more, see if there is any comparable product for high-performance or supercharged automobile engines and draw my own conclusion. i've also heard people say that storing a car with an empty gas tank is a good option. so there's that to consider.

Edited by 2007tungstenGT500

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i'm not sure a boat engine is a good example to draw from. i wouldn't use an additive like that in my car, i would research the topic more, see if there is any comparable product for high-performance or supercharged automobile engines and draw my own conclusion. i've also heard people say that storing a car with an empty gas tank is a good option. so there's that to consider.

Go to the Startron website. The additive is made for all gasoline engines (http://mystarbrite.com/startron/). Boat engines ARE a good example. I used the example because boats sit for a very long time with little use and the fuel is subject to the effects of long term degradation. The problem is no different for a car that sits for a long period of time without use. As I said previously, I have used Startron in all my vehicles and small engines for years with no fuel related issues. Empty gas tanks will accumulate condensation and you will have water in the tank over time. I would NEVER advise anyone to store a vehicle with an empty tank unless they were prepared to drain the water out before use. Very hard to do for most cars (and boats).

Edited by IngotSilverSnake

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If the car is going to be covered, I would remove the battery and store it in a well ventilated storage area and hook it up to a good battery tender. Lead acid batteries create hydrogen gas when they are being charged and you don't want a build up of hydrogen gas in an unattended vehicle, remember the Hindenburg . Also if something goes wrong with the battery or charger, your car isn't in jeopardy.

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I made the mistake of washing and parking my Roush one time without taking it out and drying the brakes good. It sat for a couple months and next time i took it out it had a bad spot on the rear rotors that had rusted between the pads and the rotors. I now make sure i dry the brakes good every time after washing.

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I made the mistake of washing and parking my Roush one time without taking it out and drying the brakes good. It sat for a couple months and next time i took it out it had a bad spot on the rear rotors that had rusted between the pads and the rotors. I now make sure i dry the brakes good every time after washing.

Good advice. After washing my Shelby I drive it around the block a couple of times to dry the brakes before putting it in the garage.

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I think the owners manuals for every car made today recommends against using fuel additives. All I can tell you is that the consequences of running stale fuel in you engine are far more serious than any risk associated with using a high quality additive like Startron. As I said above, I never heard of any problems with anyone using Startron in their boats. We had a lot of problems with customers that did not use a stabilizer when storing boats. I currently use Startron in every vehicle I own and have done so for many years. Never a fuel related issue of any kind.

I agree. I also use STABIL in my ski boat, and used it for a car that was stored 18 months with automatic charger maintainer. No issue and started right up. Good info in your post #5. Flat stoppers or over inflate about 10 psi as suggested already. Some folks use carpet.

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Interesting discussion.

The weather here has been odd and I have not been able to get my Mustang out because of ice packed roads that are not melting.

 

The car sat for last 3 weeks in my heated garage and I was getting nervous about the tires.

The Flatstoppers arrived yesterday and I used them last night. I got the ones that are 14 inches wide.

 

With this manual transmission, it was a bit difficult to get up on the Flatstoppers but it did finally happen.

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Stored manyof cars & never ever had a flat spot on any tires radial or bias., but i do over inflate them before storing.

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I guess I could have gone that route, ie putting in extra pounds.

 

The only reason I didn't is because if I am able to find a day here and there in January to drive, the roads are rough in Colorado.

I might pop a crown on a tooth or something.

Edited by lbj

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I agree with everything IngotSS said.

Living in Vermont, I've been storing cars in the winter months for ages & I am happy to say with no ill effects or consequences. Definitely plug the exhaust to keep critters out. I remove the battery completely and store it in my basement where it's heated. Knew a car collector that lost his entire building of cars because of a charger fire (brand name manufacturer, said it was a manufacturing defect)...you couldn't pay me to connect any charger and then walk away.

Oil change? yes.

Antifreeze test? most definitely!

Wash? no....it's going to be dusty anyways if it's been sitting for 6 months or better.

Flat stoppers, yes......fantastic invention.......I leave the PSI at normal.

Parking brake off and car in 1st gear.

Large desiccant bag in the trunk and 2 in the interior, sitting on plastic.

 

In the spring I will usually disconnect the ignition and crank over until I see oil pressure before starting the car.

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I agree with everything IngotSS said.

Living in Vermont, I've been storing cars in the winter months for ages & I am happy to say with no ill effects or consequences. Definitely plug the exhaust to keep critters out. I remove the battery completely and store it in my basement where it's heated. Knew a car collector that lost his entire building of cars because of a charger fire (brand name manufacturer, said it was a manufacturing defect)...you couldn't pay me to connect any charger and then walk away.

Oil change? yes.

Antifreeze test? most definitely!

Wash? no....it's going to be dusty anyways if it's been sitting for 6 months or better.

Flat stoppers, yes......fantastic invention.......I leave the PSI at normal.

Parking brake off and car in 1st gear.

Large desiccant bag in the trunk and 2 in the interior, sitting on plastic.

 

In the spring I will usually disconnect the ignition and crank over until I see oil pressure before starting the car.

 

I would clean the car if your going to put a cover on it .

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The major increase in ethanol levels in fuels over the past few years is taking a major impact to fuel systems. In the past year, I have changed 5 fuel pumps out of cars that have been in storage, between a couple of mine, my brothers, and a couple of friends. I have been blown away by what I have found. The small rubber tube from the pump to the base of the pump assembly inside the tank has been total goo in each case. My brothers Mustang that has been in my garage for a few years ran just great about 9 months ago when we took it out and put some fresh fuel in it. Then last month I went to start it and it wouldn't start. I figured the fuel pump died because I had no fuel pressure at the engine or filter. Pulled the pump and the rubber was like putty in my fingers, total goo. The filter at the bottom of the tank was crumbled and was dissolving in the tank. Yes the fuel was above the pump. The metal parts of the pump itself had like a rust like substance on it. I've never seen anything like this until the past year. Now when I know there is a car in storage that will not start, the pump in the tank is the number one thing to look at. I've also had two of my older cars that would not start due to fuel this year. On both of them, when I pulled the carburetors apart, they both had corrosion and dried up powder stuff in them plugging multiple ports. What is happening in these fuels today are going to be a huge problem with cars in storage. Just saying. I'm going to be trying the new Sta-bil 360 product and see how that goes. The above marine product sounds like it has served some well also.

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The major increase in ethanol levels in fuels over the past few years is taking a major impact to fuel systems. In the past year, I have changed 5 fuel pumps out of cars that have been in storage, between a couple of mine, my brothers, and a couple of friends. I have been blown away by what I have found. The small rubber tube from the pump to the base of the pump assembly inside the tank has been total goo in each case. My brothers Mustang that has been in my garage for a few years ran just great about 9 months ago when we took it out and put some fresh fuel in it. Then last month I went to start it and it wouldn't start. I figured the fuel pump died because I had no fuel pressure at the engine or filter. Pulled the pump and the rubber was like putty in my fingers, total goo. The filter at the bottom of the tank was crumbled and was dissolving in the tank. Yes the fuel was above the pump. The metal parts of the pump itself had like a rust like substance on it. I've never seen anything like this until the past year. Now when I know there is a car in storage that will not start, the pump in the tank is the number one thing to look at. I've also had two of my older cars that would not start due to fuel this year. On both of them, when I pulled the carburetors apart, they both had corrosion and dried up powder stuff in them plugging multiple ports. What is happening in these fuels today are going to be a huge problem with cars in storage. Just saying. I'm going to be trying the new Sta-bil 360 product and see how that goes. The above marine product sounds like it has served some well also.

Interesting Thanks for sharing.

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