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Invo Ultra High Performance Tires.

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SO I decided to install the INVOs on my 2012 gt500, stock rims, but wider sizes.

275/35/19 front

295/35/20 rear

I didn't feel any spinning and grip was a hell of a lot better, on the track.

my question is: should I have gotten wider rims to make it better?

Thank you in advance.

 

 

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SO I decided to install the INVOs on my 2012 gt500, stock rims, but wider sizes.

275/35/19 front

295/35/20 rear

I didn't feel any spinning and grip was a hell of a lot better, on the track.

my question is: should I have gotten wider rims to make it better?

Thank you in advance.

 

 

 

If you have 10" on the back & went to 11" they would stick out unless you went with a wide body kit

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I see no mud flaps in that picture ??

 

 

Thats not my car ... just a picture to show how well the tire fits in the rear quarter.

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I have Invos in 285 mm on 20" rims, stock blower with 2.6 pulley. They spin like crazy in first and second. I would not give them a high recommendation for acceleration grip, just as bad as the stock tires. They corner nicely, and are quieter than the Goodyears. Just FYI...

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Michelin Pilot Sport PS2... I just put them on and do they stick! Only negative, need to do this again in 20,000 miles

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I have 11" rear rims with invo 315's my car is also lowered significantly and I have no clearence issues.

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I have 11" rear rims with invo 315's my car is also lowered significantly and I have no clearence issues.

 

 

Same here- no issues with an 11" rim and 315's and they don't "stick out" as previously mentioned.

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How do the 315's hook up compared to the stock width 285s? I have Invos in 285 on 20" rims, and in 1st - 2nd gear, traction is non existent. I've heard good reviews about the Michelin PS2's, and might switch to them, or a real drag radial. Its so disappointing to have this much power, yet can't use any of it until 3rd gear @ 80mph. From 80 to 140, this car is a BEAST! From 0-80, is a tire frying joke :O

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If you have 10" on the back & went to 11" they would stick out unless you went with a wide body kit

 

If it is the stock/oem 20" wheels being widened from 10" to 11", all of the added 1" material would be to the inside (moving the inner lip inward by 1"), with no change to the wheel mounting surface to outer lip measurement, right? <<If this is the case, the outside measurements should be unchanged, except for possibly a different tire bulge (aspect ratio).

 

 

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M

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If it is the stock/oem 20" wheels being widened from 10" to 11", all of the added 1" material would be to the inside (moving the inner lip inward by 1"), with no change to the wheel mounting surface to outer lip measurement, right? <<If this is the case, the outside measurements should be unchanged, except for possibly a different tire bulge (aspect ratio).

 

 

 

 

R

 

No...it all depends on the offset of the of the wheel. You can look up some graphical depictions if you google wheel offset. You can get a wheel that is 1" wider with the right offset the extra inch will be added to the inner lip and it will have the same look from the outside...however you need to know that you have that kind of clearance in the wheel well. Adding 1" is not that aggressive, however to answer the question you're asking...it all depends on the wheel's offset.

 

 

How do the 315's hook up compared to the stock width 285s? I have Invos in 285 on 20" rims, and in 1st - 2nd gear, traction is non existent. I've heard good reviews about the Michelin PS2's, and might switch to them, or a real drag radial. Its so disappointing to have this much power, yet can't use any of it until 3rd gear @ 80mph. From 80 to 140, this car is a BEAST! From 0-80, is a tire frying joke :O

 

Unless you go from one extreme to the other, simply putting a wider tire on will not increase straight line traction. When you get a wider tire, you are increasing the tire footprint area to the ground. When you increase the area, you are dispersing the weight over a greater area, which will decrease the amount of weight per unit area. So yes you are getting more surface to surface contact, but you're decreasing the actual weight/pressure per unit area.

 

When talking strictly about tires, the key to getting better traction when it comes to straight line traction is all about the tire compound. Getting a "stickier" compound/better tire is the key. There are other factors when you get into extremely soft tires that you need to start getting wider to help with sidewall stiffness etc...but when it comes to straight line traction...simply getting the same tire but wider will not give you the results you're expecting.

 

Now when we talk about lateral traction...AKA turning...that's a whole 'nother ball game. In that case, wider tires play a huge role.

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No...it all depends on the offset of the of the wheel. You can look up some graphical depictions if you google wheel offset. You can get a wheel that is 1" wider with the right offset the extra inch will be added to the inner lip and it will have the same look from the outside...however you need to know that you have that kind of clearance in the wheel well. Adding 1" is not that aggressive, however to answer the question you're asking...it all depends on the wheel's offset.

 

 

 

But in this case we are talking about a wheel being removed from a car sent out to let's say Eric Vaughn, him cutting the original lip from the rear of the wheel, adding 1" to the wheel and sending it back. Nothing has changed from the disc brake mounting surface to the outside lip of the wheel. The distance from that disc brake mounting surface to the outer lip is unchanged so the wheel will stick out no further than it did before the 1" was added to the inside.

 

Believe me, I went through all of this with Alcoa's, everyone said the 9" fronts would not interchange because they were a different offset from the 10" rears. Once I laid both the 9" Alcoa and the 10" Alcoa on a flat surface and measured from the disc brake mounting surface out to the face of the wheel and found they were the same/identical, people have been moving their 10" Alcoa's (different offset) to the front on these cars and widening the 9's for the rear. The offset is measured + or - from the center line of the wheel and the center line of a 10" wheel will be further back than the center line of a 9" wheel, thus the different offset, but that does not change the fact that the outer face/lip of these wheels (Alcoa's) measured back to the disc brake mounting surface was the same and widening, even to 12" like mine made no difference to the "look" from the fender well view, it only added width to the inside and allowed for wider rubber. <<<But my car looks exactly was it did with the 10" Alcoa until you view it from behind.

 

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M

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But in this case we are talking about a wheel being removed from a car sent out to let's say Eric Vaughn, him cutting the original lip from the rear of the wheel, adding 1" to the wheel and sending it back. Nothing has changed from the disc brake mounting surface to the outside lip of the wheel. The distance from that disc brake mounting surface to the outer lip is unchanged so the wheel will stick out no further than it did before the 1" was added to the inside.

 

Believe me, I went through all of this with Alcoa's, everyone said the 9" fronts would not interchange because they were a different offset from the 10" rears. Once I laid both the 9" Alcoa and the 10" Alcoa on a flat surface and measured from the disc brake mounting surface out to the face of the wheel and found they were the same/identical, people have been moving their 10" Alcoa's (different offset) to the front on these cars and widening the 9's for the rear. The offset is measured + or - from the center line of the wheel and the center line of a 10" wheel will be further back than the center line of a 9" wheel, thus the different offset, but that does not change the fact that the outer face/lip of these wheels (Alcoa's) measured back to the disc brake mounting surface was the same and widening, even to 12" like mine made no difference to the "look" from the fender well view, it only added width to the inside and allowed for wider rubber. <<<But my car looks exactly was it did with the 10" Alcoa until you view it from behind.

 

 

 

R

 

Interesting....I've never heard of anyone actually cutting a wheel before to widen it. I have no experience with that, however I do have experience with wheels that have gotten cracks in them, attempted to be repaired, and still had issues in the future.

 

Especially when it comes to the amount of power and speed you can get with our cars...I'd never feel comfortable driving it on wheels that were cut, then rewelded together.

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I agree with the above post. I never felt safe with the idea of cutting and welding a rim. I'm no expert but you change the metallurgical properties of aluminum when you weld it, and most failures occur at the weld. I don't even trust my aftermarket rims. If I want to go fast, I use the stock rims. Those I know have been tested and approved for the car.

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Interesting....I've never heard of anyone actually cutting a wheel before to widen it. I have no experience with that, however I do have experience with wheels that have gotten cracks in them, attempted to be repaired, and still had issues in the future.

 

Especially when it comes to the amount of power and speed you can get with our cars...I'd never feel comfortable driving it on wheels that were cut, then rewelded together.

 

 

^^^^^^^I had questions about this process also, but since so many have had this done across many of these Mustang forums, (especially GT500's that really need more rubber), I have never heard of a failure yet, and there are at least two people/companies that do this widening in the U.S. (and I'm sure there are more). If it was not a safe widening process, and even if they had just a couple of failures, I'm sure they would not be in business today. They would have been sued out of business rather quickly. The one thing I noticed about my widened Alcoa's............surprisingly, they took very little weight additional when balancing the tires, even the 325/30's I currently have on the 12" rears.

 

In the case of Eric Vaughn in CA., he cuts the wheel and adds/welds a new rear section of the required width, this allows for one weld at the added section, not two welds for an added section between the two pieces.

 

 

 

 

R

Edited by Robert M

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^^^^^^^I had questions about this process also, but since so many have had this done across many of these Mustang forums, (especially GT500's that really need more rubber), I have never heard of a failure yet, and there are at least two people/companies that do this widening in the U.S. (and I'm sure there are more). If it was not a safe widening process, and even if they had just a couple of failures, I'm sure they would not be in business today. They would have been sued out of business rather quickly. The one thing I noticed about my widened Alcoa's............surprisingly, they took very little weight additional when balancing the tires, even the 325/30's I currently have on the 12" rears.

 

In the case of Eric Vaughn in CA., he cuts the wheel and adds/welds a new rear section of the required width, this allows for one weld at the added section, not two welds for an added section between the two pieces.

 

 

 

 

R

 

I just don't understand why you don't buy wheels that are just wider...

 

Like someone else said above...you change the metallurgical properties when you welt stuff...especially forged wheels. The entire point they are so strong is because they are forged. You talk to any welder about this and they will tell you. I've even had some welders turn me away when I had a small crack in my Cat-less exhaust on my MazdaSpeed3 because they said the weld will just crack again over time.

 

Once again just from my experiences when I had 3 cracked rims back when I lived in Michigan and hit HUGE potholes...even a small hairline fracture...talking 5mm long and barely wide enough to fit in a piece of paper...that was welded ended up cracking again at the same location. Welding and wheels don't go together...especially when you're talking about a car as powerful as ours.

 

P.S. assuming a company is legit because they are in business and you'd think they wouldn't be around if their product didn't work...is not a good practice. Ran into that more then once with previous cars. When it comes to critical parts...you shouldn't skimp.

 

 

Edited by AFdude10

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