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summerrodeo

07' 257 sold for 25k

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hell of a deal for somebody. owner must have wanted to dump it pretty bad. pretty sure the car still has a solid 100,000 miles of life left in it and it has a lot of desirable mods on it (excluding the garish stickers, etc).

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Doesn't sound like it was taken care of at all, I wouldn't touch it. I bet it is even worse then the description, every wheel has road rash, that alone tells me the car was not cared for at all. Just my 2 cents.

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i fully agree but how's that different from any used car? thats just cosmetic. this example is no show car, but it would make a great driver.

 

I guess it is not, that is probably why I have not bought a used car in over 10 years. Correction I bought one, but it was a 911 with 3K miles on it that looked like it had none, 3K miles saved me about $25K.

 

Before that I do not even remember the last used car I bought, I think it was the M3 I bought off my parents, that was over 10 years ago.

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Gents,

 

I know this car and I know the owner. It was driven to 4 bashes from Ohio, driven to Terlingua a couple times, and several national Ford and mustang shows. It was tracked for over 5,000 miles. Carroll Shelby personally delivered my car to me along with 14 others. He lectured all of us that day that the value of our cars would not be what they would be sold for in 30 years, but the value of our cars would be the memories that you make driving them today. I am thrilled to have been part of the memories of this car and this owner. The owner was thrilled to have owned it. I hope you guys can say the same.

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Nicely explained Don! Some people just don't get it :-)

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Gents,

 

I know this car and I know the owner. It was driven to 4 bashes from Ohio, driven to Terlingua a couple times, and several national Ford and mustang shows. It was tracked for over 5,000 miles. Carroll Shelby personally delivered my car to me along with 14 others. He lectured all of us that day that the value of our cars would not be what they would be sold for in 30 years, but the value of our cars would be the memories that you make driving them today. I am thrilled to have been part of the memories of this car and this owner. The owner was thrilled to have owned it. I hope you guys can say the same.

Possibly the best post I've ever read on any automotive forum. So true and genuine on many different levels.

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Don is absolutely right, and all us Terlingua guys and gals can vouch for it being properly serviced and cared for, and driven the way CS would hope for. Stuart is a great driver. I just wish I had a bigger garage!

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i think it's great the Mr. Shelby suggested driving these cars (versus storing them for future value), but that's exactly what you should say if you make your living building these things and want people to continually look forward to the next car you are creating/modifying. that's also easy to say for someone who has virtually unlimited funds like Mr. Shelby did. it's in the best interest of his business to say those things. in my opinion, that's bad advice for most people who will only ever own one of these cars or for whom money IS an object, which is most people.

 

personally, i think some of you are missing the point here. this car may have been properly cared for (not apparent from the listing) but it sold for way less than it should or could have. nothing wrong with enjoying these cars but that still does not make it a great buy for the next person. it's absurd to believe that you, as a random, unknown owner are giving the car provenance by driving the hell out of it at track events and bashes or by plastering stickers and badges all over it that didn't exist when it rolled off the factory floor. at the end of the day, only cars owned or driven by someone central to the Shelby legacy will be able to make that claim and only cars that left the factory floor looking that way will be regarded as desirable. in the end, it's always unmolested, low mileage models that attract the most interest. there's also nothing wrong with taking care of these cars so that they can be enjoyed by you or someone else for a long time to come.

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I know I would have gladly purchased it for $25k if I could have talked the better half into it. I simply like the 40th cars and would like to have one as a driver rather than a garage queen. I'm the guy you were speaking of that may only own one of these in my lifetime. So, I pamper it.

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Can't take it with you so may as well drive it. I bought mine for ME to enjoy. Life is short, I have always heard that but it was proven to me well 6 months ago when I lost my child :-( He taught me to enjoy every day as if it was my last as you just don't know. These Shelby's will not command big $$$ like their older brothers did. There will be too many around in 40 years since no one is driving them!

 

PS. I am not worried about the next guy!

Edited by msmap

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I agree. That's a valid perspective to have and it definitely makes sense for you. Nothing wrong there. But you can't insinuate that the rest of us aren't enjoying our cars simply because we don't participate in Terlingua events or have Bob Neale sign our dash.

 

I also think it's impossible to predict the future. You are definitely right that there are way more produced today than were made back in the day. It's also true that the original cars were created at a point in time when Carroll was heavily involved in racing, which is not true of today's models. However, today's cars are far superior in every aspect to the early cars. Today's cars offer a far more appealing ownership proposition as they are mechanically superior, more comfortable, easier to operate, easy to maintain and perform much better by every measure. We are in a much more global economy today and there are simply more people populating the planet than there were 50 years ago. We are already seeing the transition to electronic steering, digital enhancement of engine sound, extremely sophisticated automatic transmissions, digitally-controlled suspension settings and more. If the technology continues to evolve down the path of smaller, more efficient cars, hybrid and electric power-plants, our cars just might someday obtain a level of collect-ability that we did not foresee. The driving experience we have now with a solid rear axle, mechanical steering, 6-speed transmission and a supercharged V-8 engine, will absolutely change in the future.

Edited by 2007red40thGT500

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We are not insinuating that you don't enjoy your car cuz you dont go to Terlingua. Who is Bob Neil? You should not insinuate that because we drive our cars we are tearing them up and devaluing them with garish stickers that came from Shelby run events and not the factory. Just because they do get dirty sometimes does not mean they have been thrown up on (someone said Stuart's car looked like it had) and don't clean up to win shows. Yours has a few miles on it and was not a garage Queen with its prior owners :)

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Nicely explained Don! Some people just don't get it :-)

 

Here is where you insinuated (see quote above).

 

I definitely get it. You are correct... I am saying that you ARE devaluing the car by driving the hell out of it and personalizing it with stickers that were not on the car when it was new from the factory. If you don't care about the next guy, then it doesn't matter if you do those things. However, the end result is you get a 40th anniversary car sold for $25,000 like the one that started this thread!

 

As far as my car goes, I know you owned it temporarily pending a divorce by the original owner, but it's incredibly annoying for you to comment on it like it is STILL yours. I know the history of the car. Fortunately, the mileage, mechanical and cosmetic condition of the car was good enough for me to buy it. Upon delivery, I promptly got rid of all of the aftermarket upgrades that came from 3rd party vendors, removed all of the unnecessary decals and bought all remaining backup parts needed to return the car exactly to 40th anniversary stock condition, including a few extra pieces that may wear out over time. The only thing I don't know is how 5th gear got jacked up? It's fine if you know there's a slight notch to workaround, but my guess is it happened during one of these Shelby events you speak of.

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Upon delivery, I promptly got rid of all of the aftermarket upgrades that came from 3rd party vendors, removed all of the unnecessary decals and bought all remaining backup parts needed to return the car exactly to 40th anniversary stock condition, including a few extra pieces that may wear out over time.

So this isn't the same car you are talking about in your signature? I'm confused. :headscratch:

 

Additional Aftermarket Upgrades
APR Carbon Fiber Front Splitter
Ford Racing 2.3L TVS w/Cold Air Intake
Ford Racing 3.73 Differential Gears
Ford Racing Finned Differential Cover
Ford Racing FR500S Mufflers
Ford Racing Front Brake Duct Kit
Ford Racing Shorty Headers (Ceramic)
Ford Racing SVT Crankshaft Damper
Ford Racing Valve Covers (Blue)
MRT H-Pipe w/Hi-Flow Cats
Shelby 20x9", 20x11" Razor Wheels (Silver)
Shelby Axle Reservoir
Shelby Aluminum Drive Shaft
Shelby Extreme Duty Coolant Reservoir Tanks
Shelby Extreme Duty Heat Exchanger
Shelby Extreme Duty Radiator
Shelby Fuse Box Cover
Shelby Kicker Subwoofer
Shelby Lower Control Arm Relocation Brackets
Shelby Oil Seperator
Shelby Shift Handle & Knob
Shelby Short-Throw Shifter
Shelby Transmission Cooler Scoop
Shelby Rear Upper Control Arm
Shelby Watts Link

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About time the 40th Forum actually got some posts. :cool:

You guys are far too nice though. Take the gloves off! :slapfight:

Edited by Torch40

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About time the 40th Forum actually got some posts. :cool:

You guys are far too nice though. Take the gloves off! :slapfight:

Don't tempted me Andy :-)

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Thanks for clarifying, Bob. Stuart and Bea's car was very well taken care of and someone got a great deal!

 

Sherri does drive the hell out of her car, as do many people with 40th's that actually drive their cars and enjoy them. like Carroll appreciated and liked to see. Her car has 60K miles on it npw and still looks and drives great. :shift:

 

Take off the gloves Sherri, I'm with Andy!!! :stirpot:

 

Alex

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Mine has been driven cross country twice, out the Dearborn, down to North Carolina, toured New England with Sean, has seen rain, snow, cow manure ( New England tour) and tracked at least 6 times. Still cleans up to show room condition. I don't think I am going to live long enough to see these increase in value so I enjoy driving the hell out of it. Like Sherri said "I am not worried about the next guy". If starring at it in the garage floats your boat, great. I drive the hell out of all my cars but keep them maintained to showroom condition.

 

Sherri/Alex

Terlingua is on my bucket list. Maybe next year.

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Ladies and Gents,

 

Just finished our 7 week road trip (Route 66 and PCH from San Diego to Canada. Back to back! Total trip 8,650 miles) so I am going to weigh back in. This retirement thing is a bitch. Went to Amy's bar in North Hollywood. Tonga Hut, the oldest Tiki bar in CA. It was great. For those that want to see how a great neighborhood bar from the 50's is suppose to be, this is the ticket.

 

I can't speak for anyone but Don, so these are my thoughts on what was originally posted and a further explanation of my response to those posts.

 

I took exception to the tone of the posts implying that this car had not been taken care of and trashed because of the high mileage. I wanted to add personal knowledge of the car to the thread. I had just ridden in this car not 30 days before it was sold. This car could compete in the modified class (which is what all 40th's compete in regardless of stickers or add on parts) in any Mustang show and most likely beat whatever else was in that class including other 40th's, even the garage queens. It certainly would be in the money, and it was several times at national events.

 

Relaying Mr. Shelby's heartfelt comments was simply my way to illustrate that these cars are not financial investments and anybody that believes that is foolish and will miss out on the real thrill of owning one, i.e., driving them at high speeds and on the track.

 

Now, I admit, I did take a poke at the end, because I don't know if the definition of thrill is looking at a cars in the garage, which is what I gathered from the direction of the thread. Pride, yes, thrill, well, I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

 

This car is a thoroughbred. It participated in the only official Bull Run sponsored by SAI (folks, the Bull Run organization put this together for Shelby. It was the real deal and there will never ever be another one), spent hours on the track at Mid America, and was driven to top speeds of over 170 mph on several occasions and I objected to it being discussed like a plow horse. I just wanted to give the car and its original owner the dignity they deserve.

 

Regarding the comments in the follow up posts concerning Mr. Shelby giving bad advice to Shelby owners by telling them to drive their cars and make memories in the process versus leaving them in the garage to perhaps appreciate in financial value at some point in the future and his motivation for doing so for financial gain is more objectionable to me than the original posts. Those of us that had the pleasure and opportunity to meet and spend time with Mr. Shelby recognize how misguided this understanding of his relationship to Shelby car owners actually was. Perhaps the most authoritative person on Mr. Shelby is Austin Craig. I would love to see his reaction to these comments. LOL!

 

The good news is there is plenty of room in the Shelby camp for garage queens and speed demons. There is nothing better than seeing a 30 year old car that is pristine with only 12 miles on it unless of course the first 10 miles were driven at 170 miles per hour. I suspect that that owner will have a much, much bigger smile when they tell you "its only got 12 miles on it". I could be wrong, it won't be the first time and certainly not the last.

 

Now those of us that have a few battle scars, a little road rash on the wheels, and perhaps a few add on's, wear these stripes with great pride even knowing that it may affect the value of the car if we ever have to sell. But it's a pretty big smile when you get to tell the new owner that "its only got 60,000 miles on it, but 30,000 were on the track at 170 mph!) Hell, I remember picking up the air splitter on the highway that blew off the first GT350 that Shelby produced. Now, that's a memory! The owner will never forget it. We won't let him.

 

I can only imagine the look on Patterson's face when he says, "Now lets go and have some damn fun" when I respond, "I'm having fun Gary, I'm looking at my car in the garage and it doesn't get any better than that" (It's a joke, just kidding)

 

Ok Don, now back to the attic you troublemaker.

 

 

 

 

 

.

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i think it's great the Mr. Shelby suggested driving these cars (versus storing them for future value), but that's exactly what you should say if you make your living building these things and want people to continually look forward to the next car you are creating/modifying. that's also easy to say for someone who has virtually unlimited funds like Mr. Shelby did. it's in the best interest of his business to say those things. in my opinion, that's bad advice for most people who will only ever own one of these cars or for whom money IS an object, which is most people.

 

 

While the above statement is certainly your opinion I have to disagree that was ever Carroll's intention for you to purchase another Shelby when he would say he built these cars to be driven. From a child all the way up to his passing, Carroll was addicted to performance in any form and never was concerned with low mile, unmodified museum pieces that some owners tucked away in their garage.

 

There was a 35 year gap between Shelby Mustang production so I'm not following how Carroll would have benefited to say "those things" as a sales incentive for someones next car purchase. My first recollection of Carroll saying he thought his cars should be driven was decades ago during SAAC conventions when enthusiasts would tell Carroll they have one of his cars under blankets in their garage or that they just spent this amount of money to restore their Shelby and now they don't drive it. Carroll just never understood that line of thinking. My guess is that Carroll always felt that tomorrow may not be there for him so he lived for the moment and not the future.

 

Now with that said I want to add that I've always agreed with Carroll's view on driving his cars but I base my opinion from a different point of view. I think many of you would be shocked at the number of families I interact with where the widow or the Shelby owners children contact Shelby American telling me that their husband or father has passed away and that they don't know what to do with the Shelby parked in their garage that their husband or father never drove.

 

They go on about how their husband/father would constantly polish & wax the car, kept the plastic on the seats, tucked the car in under a car cover but would never drive the car because it was "special" and that he was preserving it in anticipation of that "one day". Well that one day never came and now the family has to accept the reality that this "one day" car is worth half of what the owner paid for it.

 

Just think of the memories the family could have had if dad had driven the car. I'm sure memories of taking the Shelby to the State fair, local theme park or Sunday ice cream with the grand kids would have been more memorable than the memory of a car sitting in the garage, under a car cover that the family has no connection to other than it not being worth the million bucks that dad said it would.

 

The great thing is that this is America and we have the freedom to chose which avenue is best for us. For some driving the snot out of their Shelby works for them and not for others but in my opinion the ones who drive their cars will have the most memories and will always have the option of restoring their car to like new condition.

 

Steve

Edited by shelbymotorsports
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