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      ABOUT TEAM SHELBY   01/01/2007

          Member Benefits:   First, there's the Team Shelby swag. No other club packs your membership kit with more than Team Shelby! Whether you are a renewing member or new to the “family” of Shelby enthusiast worldwide, our goal is to help you enjoy a high-octane lifestyle!   From a Unique Membership Card, Shelby Annual Magazine, Team Shelby Hat, Collector Coin, Team Shelby T-Shirt, Windshield Cling, Team Shelby License Plate Frame, Lapel Pin and Magnet, the contents of your Team Shelby Membership Kit more than pay for your membership alone!   In addition, your membership includes:   Exclusive Access to Team Shelby Member Forums.   10% discounts at Carroll Shelby's Stores in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.   Driving Experiences.   Invitations to Exclusive Team Shelby Member Events.   Insider information from Shelby American.   Affiliate Partner Discounts.   Updated February 16, 2017. Team Shelby Club 2018 Team Shelby Membership Kit Please note that membership contents are subject to change.   Team Shelby was designed and engineered by real enthusiasts inside and out of Shelby.   Team Shelby was originally formed in 2008 by Carroll Shelby. He wanted to create a club for people to truly enjoy their cars. He knew the world had changed, and he wanted his companies to meet the needs of the new generation of Shelby owners. His vision was to knit together those people with the owners of early Shelby's and give everyone fun new ways to experience their high performance vehicles.   Mr. Shelby imagined a place where owners could talk about their latest conquests at the track, swap stories, share photos and learn new ways to hot rod their cars! He wanted to link all of the enthusiasts into one "dream garage"... thus, Team Shelby was born!   Team Shelby has many free, open access forums, news sections and member only areas dedicated to the community.   In addition, Team Shelby has a full series of events for 2018, which include VIP Experiences, track days, National & Regional gatherings, cruises, car shows and more! Ownership of a Shelby is not required to be a member. The club is dedicated to serving all Shelby enthusiasts past and present including those that own cars built in the 1960's and Shelby Dodges too! Carroll Shelby (Team Shelby Member #001) said: "We built Team Shelby for anyone who is passionate about Shelby cars! We’ll have a blast and we'll do it the Shelby way!   Yearly Membership Rates   U.S. $49.99 | Canada & Mexico $59.99 | E.U., others $65.99   Join the Team Shelby Club   click here to choose a Team Shelby Club subscription package.   Membership Kit Arrival   Your Team Shelby Club membership kit and I.D.card will generally arrive within 6-8 weeks.   Need Help?   Email Brianna:  e-mail her here.
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Pockdog

Considering a Move from Northern California to Texas...

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California is really going to get bad on Tax Hikes real soon..................Get out NOW while you can as I am sure your Governor is probably trying to figure out an "Exit Tax" for those leaving.

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I've thought about moving from Nor Cal to TX a few times over the past 20 years. I work for Applied Materials and they have a large manufacturing presence in Austin. But, two things always keep me from going- friends and family. I was born and raised in Silicon Valley and it's tough to leave. Luckily I live in the country, in the Santa Cruz Mountains. I've got two acres of land and a half hour drive to work in the morning. Being surrounded by liberals is what I've been used to my whole life, so it's not hard for me. One thing I tell my boss in Austin is he has to invest a LOT of money to compete with the capital appreciation over time that housing achieves here in Nor Cal. You might pay out the ass for your house, but stay in it long enough and you're almost certain to have a great return.

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Dallas/Fort Worth. To sum it up, if you want to live in a large metro area, there is nothing finer anywhere.

 

Springer,

 

How is the weather in Dallas/Fort Worth? Specifically, the seasons?

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I moved to Ft Worth in Oct. it was still warm enough to use the pool until almost Halloween. The winter was very mild, lowest temps got was maybe 29-30 degrees. We had a sprinkle of snow that lasted 5 minutes. Ice storms are possible and no one here knows how to drive in those conditions. The city gets shut down with just the threat of icy conditions. The main weather concern folks have here is hail. It can get up to softball size apparently. A garage is a must as is the right homeowners insurance policy. Roofing companies make a killing out here. Summers will be warm, can get into triple digits and can be sticky with humidity. For the last 2 months it's been great here, temps between 60-80. Great car weather.

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I keep hearing about Hill Country; where exactly is it and what cities/areas does it comprise? How bad is the humidity in that area?

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I almost moved to Houston and then Dallas for work, coming from New England I just couldn't do it. Even though MA is liberal I'm in Western MA where it's not bad at all. California I could not handle so your situation is different. I would visit before you commit, I can't stand heat and that was a deal breaker, especially for Houston. Also we like our privacy, but also enjoy living in a neighborhood for the kids. Neighborhoods are amazing in Texas, but getting that with privacy seemed impossible. Lots were tiny compared to home sizes. They had bigger lots, but they weren't in communities. The amount of power lines and billboards was insane, it appears there are no restrictions on that. I guess I'm just used to New England scenery. I'm told their is mountains/hills and trees in Texas, I couldn't find them. I think it would've been something I could've gotten used too, but I declined. A few more random thoughts, it was very flat, and outside of the beautiful neighborhoods was very ugly. Not trying to be an ass, I'm just stating what I saw.

 

My wife hates winters, she probably would've loved it after the initial shock of many differences between Texas and New England.

 

Good luck!!!!

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The Hill Country is west of Austin and San Antonio. Nice area. Real Estate is affordable. Can find nice homes on large lots. Most lots out of the towns are Well water and septic systems. No good paying jobs. No Malls for the Wifey. Would have to drive to Austin or San Antonio for work and upscale shopping. Perfect if you plan to retire. Alot of Car People.

 

Not sure what your income is, but if you are upper middle class or lower upper class or above, the areas in the western Austin Suburbs, if that is what you want to call them, are really really nice. You can get anything you would like for between 600K - 1.2 million. Shopping, lakes, resturants -all there. Austin 20 minutes away. Night life and weekends in Austin are the best. My wife and I live in Austin and are empty nesters. We would move to that area, except it is just the two of us so we stay in our little house in Austin.

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I almost moved to Houston and then Dallas for work, coming from New England I just couldn't do it. Even though MA is liberal I'm in Western MA where it's not bad at all. California I could not handle so your situation is different. I would visit before you commit, I can't stand heat and that was a deal breaker, especially for Houston. Also we like our privacy, but also enjoy living in a neighborhood for the kids. Neighborhoods are amazing in Texas, but getting that with privacy seemed impossible. Lots were tiny compared to home sizes. They had bigger lots, but they weren't in communities. The amount of power lines and billboards was insane, it appears there are no restrictions on that. I guess I'm just used to New England scenery. I'm told their is mountains/hills and trees in Texas, I couldn't find them. I think it would've been something I could've gotten used too, but I declined. A few more random thoughts, it was very flat, and outside of the beautiful neighborhoods was very ugly. Not trying to be an ass, I'm just stating what I saw.

 

My wife hates winters, she probably would've loved it after the initial shock of many differences between Texas and New England.

 

Good luck!!!!

 

 

Sorry to hear you had a less than amazing experience in TX. It sounds like most of your viewpoint comes from the Houston area, the flattest, most humid, most densely populated part of the state. Keep in mind that TX is 1/3 the size of the cont US. So much diverse geography, but different from NE, you have to drive 6-8 hours (300-600miles) to get to something different. I would recommend you come out for a another visit in a different part of the state and hopefully have a more positive experience. A trip to Luchenbach area is good for the soul!

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Sorry to hear you had a less than amazing experience in TX. It sounds like most of your viewpoint comes from the Houston area, the flattest, most humid, most densely populated part of the state. Keep in mind that TX is 1/3 the size of the cont US. So much diverse geography, but different from NE, you have to drive 6-8 hours (300-600miles) to get to something different. I would recommend you come out for a another visit in a different part of the state and hopefully have a more positive experience. A trip to Luchenbach area is good for the soul!

 

You're correct I spent most of my time in Houston when I was offered the position, I flew down for 3-4 days to check it out prior to deciding. Several months later they offered Dallas. I've been to Dallas, but it was prior to the possibility of moving there so I didn't look around a lot.

 

I will have to check it out again, I wouldn't mind leaving the winters behind.

Edited by carnut12

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...and don't forget the high crime rate there too.

I've never had a crime problem in 57 years in Houston. But I have never lived where there is city bus service.
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The Hill Country is west of Austin and San Antonio. Nice area. Real Estate is affordable. Can find nice homes on large lots. Most lots out of the towns are Well water and septic systems. No good paying jobs. No Malls for the Wifey. Would have to drive to Austin or San Antonio for work and upscale shopping. Perfect if you plan to retire. Alot of Car People.

 

Not sure what your income is, but if you are upper middle class or lower upper class or above, the areas in the western Austin Suburbs, if that is what you want to call them, are really really nice. You can get anything you would like for between 600K - 1.2 million. Shopping, lakes, resturants -all there. Austin 20 minutes away. Night life and weekends in Austin are the best. My wife and I live in Austin and are empty nesters. We would move to that area, except it is just the two of us so we stay in our little house in Austin.

Thanks for the recap. "Well water and septic systems"....something I'd never considered.

What parts of TX are prone to twisters?

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The extreme weather events are mostly in north Texas. Houston, San Antonio have severe thunderstorms but usually no hail. Inner Houston city has their usual low life thuggery, hands out for everything free mentality. Suburbs are ok. As Tim said , no problems in years other than once in a while bored little rich kid stuff. Also one of the best medical centers in the world is here. And close to the Gulf of Mexico for beach stuff and fishing.

There are a ton of new neighborhoods being built and a ton of brand new houses. Almost all of the neighborhoods have a community pool and playground. The newest ones have pools, water parks and lazy rivers for residents and their guests only. Most have an elementary school within them too.

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Don't worry about twisters :twister: .... just take a few days to build a windbreak around your property and you'll be OK :thumbsup: !

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I am born and raised in Texas...(a long time ago too).

I've lived on the Gulf Coast, in Houston area, Dallas County, and now Tarrant County (think Fort Worth side).

 

Like many places, school districts will vary depending on location, so check them out for your kids.

Grapevine/Colleyville has excellent schools IMO.

Hurst Euless Bedford, Grapevine, Colleyville, and Keller are all good locales, depending on where you work (drive times can be tough like any BIG City).

 

If you want more space and fewer people, North and West of Fort Worth offers lots of choices.

 

Like others have said Texas has NO State Income Tax, but we do have Sales Tax.

 

Summers are HOT (can be Brutal at times), but there is NO OTHER Place where I'd rather live....(I'm a little bit opinionated...LOL)

 

I love to VISIT Sonoma Wine Country, but you couldn't pay me enough to LIVE in CA. (not a SLAM, I just LOVE TEXAS)

 

Good Luck on your research and possible move to Texas!

Edited by grok2008

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Springer,

 

How is the weather in Dallas/Fort Worth? Specifically, the seasons?

 

Since I went from FL where its hot and sunny most of the time and seasons, what are seasons? lol When I got to TX this is really first time in my life I experienced seasons because when the Fall came it cooled off unlike FL where its still in the 80's and 90's. Then come Winter time I was presently surprised at how mild the Winter is in North TX where most of the time at night it would get down to 40's sometimes high 30's then in daytime its up to low 60's which was great. The 4 years I was there it only snowed maybe 2-3 times a year. Spring time was still very mild from 60's to 70's and 50's at night, however come Summer in TX that was a huge difference then the heat in South FL but you get used to it. This Irishman loves his potatoes so to explain Texas summer heat well in south FL with 85 to 95 percent humidity its like a skillet of fried potatoes and in TX where its much less humidity with temps in the 90's to 103 its like a baked potato. Its a nasty dry heat for sure like Vegas just not as hot but TX has a lot of joints with frozen margarita's to solve that problem.

 

You've seen that vacation commercial Texas is like a whole other country, its true. Texans are so nice that it was quite a shock for this boy coming from FL where everyone is rude

 

Two places to eat, Saltgrass Steakhouse and Bone Daddy's House of Smoke

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I would be interested in the hills of TX, otherwise AZ or PA for me. I've overstayed my time in CA also. The beach kept me 20 years to long but the gun laws are putting me over the fence.

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I would be interested in the hills of TX, otherwise AZ or PA for me. I've overstayed my time in CA also. The beach kept me 20 years to long but the gun laws are putting me over the fence.

What a coincidence...we have a realtor pulling listings in the Hill Country right now. We're both native San Diegans and the state has just gotten too crazy, in so many ways. And I'm one who said I'd never, ever leave San Diego county!

 

John

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I would hold off on Texas for a while. Wait until it dry's out.

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I would hold off on Texas for a while. Wait until it dry's out.

No kidding! Prescott is looking better all the time.

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Anyone know how long you have to register your cars once you move to TX? How hard is it; as bad as CA?...thanks.

 

Oh, by the way, 2 more Republik of Kalifornia escapees are heading your way.

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Anyone know how long you have to register your cars once you move to TX? How hard is it; as bad as CA?...thanks.

 

Oh, by the way, 2 more Republik of Kalifornia escapees are heading your way.

Once a year and it's easy.

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Once a year and it's easy.

Is there a process like a smog test and all that when you first register a car?

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Is there a process like a smog test and all that when you first register a car?

Not in San Antonio, which BTW is the best place in TX to live. I don't know about other cities though.

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Anyone know how long you have to register your cars once you move to TX? How hard is it; as bad as CA?...thanks.

 

Oh, by the way, 2 more Republik of Kalifornia escapees are heading your way.

 

 

Once a year and it's easy.

 

 

I think the question is once you've moved to the new state how long do you have to move your license/registration from the old state to the new state. Usually it's a couple of months or less once you have a permanent address.Most people want ID with a local address soon after they relocate so that triggers the drivers license. Cars and trailers and boats and RVs etc follow soon since your old insurance probably also has a timeout... It cascades pretty quickly.

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Is there a process like a smog test and all that when you first register a car?

 

I kinda doubt that the free-western state of Texas has smog tests :) However every state I've moved to with a car from another state has required a VIN verification for the first time registration. In colorado I could get any police officer to do it (and they came to my hosuse for the Cobra and GT), otherwise I drove to the local station or one time I even caught a highway patrolman coming out of the gas station. In NV the DMV had a drive up station dedicated to VIN verification. Collector cars also may have other requirements but nothing near what people have to go trough with CA's SB100.

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